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Thanks for visiting Cultivating Culture, your gateway into museums, art, and galleries and news on who is supporting them.

A picture of the Statue of Liberty, located in New York City.

How New York City is Fighting Back Against Trump’s Budget Cuts to Art Programs

Early drafts of the Trump Administration’s budget proposed to kill several major sources of culture funding, including: The National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and the Institute of Museum of Library services. Nothing is set in stone yet, but New York City, a city which […]

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Two elderly artists painting.

An Art Gallery for Those Aged 60+

The world of gallery artists is a young world. Mostly, it is full of either the young outbreak star, or the middle-aged men who were young outbreak stars thirty years ago and have done nothing but commit their lives to art since. Marlena Vaccaro’s gallery is a craigy boulder in that youthful stream. Her space, […]

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Two school-aged boys—one black, one white.

New Art Exhibit Addresses Racial Segregation in America’s Schools

In Brown v. Board of Education, the Supreme Court ruled that it was unconstitutional to segregate school children by race. But today, more than sixty years later, school segregation appears to be on the rise. More than one third of black American students attend an “intensely racially segregated” school, according to a study released this […]

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A black-and-white historical photo of Italian men awaiting admission processing at Ellis island. Ca. 1910.

Interactive NYC Art Installation Gives a Voice to America’s Immigrants

Current research suggests that within 40 years, a third of American citizens will either be an immigrant or the child of an immigrant. New York City has exceeded that ration for years, and its eight and a half million residents speak nearly 800 different languages. It’s this melange that artist Aman Mojadidi wants to highlight […]

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A picture of a Shakespeare book.

Sponsors Pull Support for ‘Julius Caesar’ Amid Trump Controversy

“Serious question, when does ‘art’ become political speech & does that change things?” asked Donald Trump Jr. in a tweet. He was commenting on Public Theater’s new production of “Julius Caesar,” one of the William Shakespeare’s historical drama plays. When does “Julius Caesar” become political? It was political long before it was even written. It […]

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A close-up photo of a camera lens.

Interactive ‘Hansel and Gretel’ Exhibit Recreates the Feeling of Being Watched

Shambling around in a large, dark space with uneven floors and walls sounds like a particularly avant-garde brand of art installation. Over-head, flying drones buzz unseen while you bumble into your fellow art appreciators. And on the floor below you, the only light in the room projects your own path. The projections are an infrared […]

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A pegasus sculpture by Vivianne Duchini.

Vivianne Duchini: The Argentine Sculptor Everyone Should Know

Vivianne Duchini is an art powerhouse from Argentina who is known for her massive bronze sculptures. She’s been crafting horse sculptures since she was five years old, working in clay, wax, plaster, and even metals. It is her spirited sculptures of horses and dogs that have bolstered her to international fame. Her most famous work […]

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A pianist playing in Washington Square Park, located in Manhattan.

60 Public Pianos to be Placed Throughout NYC

Sing for Hope is a New York City community service organization. “New York City is the cultural capital of the world–and yet too many residents lack regular and affordable access to high-quality arts programming,” a statement from their website reads. As a small part of their effort to correct that deficit, they’re placing 60 art-piece pianos throughout […]

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A photo of San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury neighborhood, where the Summer of Love first began.

The Summer of Love Turns 50

This summer marks the 50th anniversary of San Francisco’s Summer of Love, a cultural phenomenon that took place in the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood in 1967 but was reflected across the world. Depending on who you talk to, it was either a fleeting moment of the counterculture hippie extravaganza already going on at that time—or it was […]

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A painting by graffiti artist Jean-Michel Basquiat.

The Man Who Bought $110.5 Million Basquiat Painting Speaks Out About His Purchase

Ever since Sotheby’s became the go-to name in art auctions, only ten works have sold for over $100 million. Now it’s eleven. Late in the evening on Thursday, May 18th, an untitled 1982 painting by graffiti artist Jean-Michel Basquiat was sold to a private collector for $110.5 million, making it the sixth most expensive work […]

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